Wednesday, October 26, 2005

Press-clippings

Tuesday, November 29, 2005

Govt to discuss rejection of sedition provisions (ABC) "
The Federal Coalition is expected to discuss over the coming two days a Senate committee recommendation to scrap sedition offences from the counter-terrorism legislation. The Federal Attorney-General Philip Ruddock has rejected a call by a government-led committee to remove the sedition provisions from the legislation. ... Labor's Peter Garrett says Mr Ruddock cannot ignore the recommendation, which he says is based on overwhelming evidence. "This Senate committee and its bipartisan report means that they have listened very closely to the wide range of views - legal views, view from the arts community from media representatives - that there is no place for sedition laws of this kind in legislation," he said. "Mr Ruddock as Attorney-General is simply completely out of step." The Government and Labor say they want the counter-terrorism measures passed in the next two weeks.


Monday, November 14, 2005

Sedition provisions to remain: PM (The Age) -
Prime Minister John Howard has ruled out removing sedition clauses from the government's counter-terrorism package, despite warnings they could limit free speech by the opposition and Labor premiers.

Their concerns were echoed today by legal and human rights groups at a Senate committee hearing on the anti-terror bill.

Thursday, November 10, 2005

Proof new law not needed (The Age) -
The use of existing laws in this week's terror arrests shows police don't need a swathe of new powers.

Wednesday, November 2, 2005


Surprise: "it would be a foolhardy party leader or premier who would continue to raise objections to the new counter-terrorism laws, with the threat of a terrorist attack hanging ominously overhead..." (ABC TV News)

Bracks joins anti-terrorism bill backers (ABC) - "Victorian Premier Steve Bracks will tell Prime Minister John Howard that he will sign up to national counter-terrorism laws today. New South Wales Premier Morris Iemma now says he is ready to back the new laws and Queensland Premier Peter Beattie believes he could also do a deal. The Federal Government needs the support of at least four of the states in order to implement the laws."

PM 'excluding' ACT from anti-terrorism bill talks (ABC) - "ACT Chief Minister Jon Stanhope says Prime Minister John Howard has once again excluded him from further negotiations around the draft anti-terrorism legislation."

PM fast-tracks terror laws (The Age) (ABC story here) - Prime Minister John Howard says Australian intelligence authorities have received specific information about a terrorist threat in Australia and means to pass extraordinary legislation tonight.

Margo Kingston's web-diary has loads of press links and plenty of interesting commentary.

Tuesday, November 1, 2005
Solicitors-general urge anti-terrorism law changes (ABC online) - The State Labor Governments seem to have taken on a "softening" role. `Queensland Premier Peter Beattie has told Channel Nine the recommendations relate to constitutional and judicial issues, as well as the referral of powers to the Commonwealth and the implementation of the public interest monitor (PIM).'

Artists, journalists voice anti-terrorism laws concerns (ABC online) - Fears of a chill: `Australia's largest news organisations, Fairfax and News Limited, are teaming up to lobby the Government over the laws. A draft letter to the Government states: "The expansion of the sedition laws contemplated in this bill is the greatest threat to publication imposed by the Government in the history of the Commonwealth."'

Monday, October 31, 2005
PM Faces Pressure on Terror Laws (The Age) - State Premiers refuse to be rushed into approving the new draft of the anti-terror legislation. The timetable for introducing the bill into Parliament is now uncertain although Mr Howard would like it in this week (the same week as the IR laws!!)

See also the views of Labor MP Daryl Melham, who raises concerns about the retrospective nature of the laws.

Sunday, October 30, 2005
Sedition bill 'a threat to arts' - (The Sunday Age) Opposition spokesman for the arts and former Midnight Oil star Peter Garrett says the proposed law could catch writers and performers.

Saturday, October 29, 2005
Leaders reserve decision on anti-terror laws - the Government's latest draft of anti-terrorism legislation is being reviewed by State and Territory leaders this weekend. The latest draft contains confidentiality provisions that prevent Government leaders from publishing the draft of the laws.

Tuesday, September 27, 2005
Proposed legislation in Australia would make it a crime for one parent to tell the other that their child had been detained under anti-terror laws, a report says.

ASIO bungles swoop - "On Tuesday, Mr Daye will take Mr O'Sullivan and the Commonwealth Government to the District Court, seeking damages of up to $750,000 for a bungled swoop by ASIO agents and heavily armed police on his Mascot home. It is a story that anyone interested in the subject should read now. Under the proposed anti-terrorism laws, stories like Mr Daye's could not be told."

States approve new anti-terrorism laws - The state and territory leaders have reached an agreement with the Commonwealth over proposed anti-terrorism legislation.



1 Comments:

At 2:53 AM, Blogger fieldmouse said...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20051022/wl_afp/australiaattacksjustice - Proposed legislation in Australia would make it a crime for one parent to tell the other that their child had been detained under anti-terror laws, a report says.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/read-all-about-it--soon-it-will-be-a-crime/2005/10/27/1130400311075.html - "On Tuesday, Mr Daye will take Mr O'Sullivan and the Commonwealth Government to the District Court, seeking damages of up to $750,000 for a bungled swoop by ASIO agents and heavily armed police on his Mascot home.

It is a story that anyone interested in the subject should read now. Under the proposed anti-terrorism laws, stories like Mr Daye's could not be told."

 

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